Each episode of This is Not a Poem delves into the intricacies of translation, poetry, and language.

Host, Elliott KB often talks with a featured poet or translator about the craft of translation and the many poets who capture our hearts in both French and English.


Episode 3 – The trace we leave behind by Patrick Williamson

This week in This is not a poem Elliott KB speaks with poet and translator Patrick Williamson about the marks translation leaves on a poetic text, the challenge of writing to a theme, and the unique relationship each translator has with a source text and its author.

Having been translated into multiple languages, including French and Italian, Patrick Williamson describes how each language has a different poetic impact, the references that inspired his latest poems, and how his translator Guido Cupani truly understands his poetic voice.

This Episode was hosted by Elliott KB, produced by Yannick Champion-Osselin, created by World Radio Paris, and recorded in our studios in Paris, France.

Who is Patrick Williamson?

Patrick Williamson is an English poet who has lived in Paris for many years. Employed as a professional translator, poet, and editor, he is known for his multilingual poetry and collaborations across art forms. Translated into multiple languages, he has recently been working between English and Italian, notably publishing Traversi with Samuele Editore in 2018.

The trace we leave behind, by Patrick Williamson in Traversi. Discover the collection here.

Our Host

In Paris via New York and Iowa, Elliott KB is a poet and translator whose work explores themes of estrangement, place, body, gender and intimacy. They have published award-winning poetry in online and print publications alike, and currently work both in the publishing industry and as a professional translator. A part of an interdisciplinary artistic scene, they have now joined the world of radio to host This is Not a Poem.


Episode 2 – Mary Oliver’s Spring with Clairette Durand-Gasselin

This week in This is not a poem Elliott KB looks into American poet Mary Oliver’s Spring alongside poet and artist Clairette Durand-Gasselin, who has a personal translation of the text.

Bringing up questions like “why does this poem make me cry?” and “how do we translate the untranslatable?”, they discuss how a person’s reading of a poem can be intimately personal, the beauty of nature, and how seemingly plain English can evoke overwhelming emotions. 

tThis Episode was hosted by Elliott KB, produced by Yannick Champion-Osselin, created by World Radio Paris, and recorded in our studios in Paris, France.

Who is Mary Oliver?

Mary Oliver (September 10, 1935 – January 17, 2019) was an acclaimed American poet celebrated for her deep connection to nature. Born in Ohio, USA, Oliver’s poetry, marked by lyrical reflections on the natural world, gained widespread acclaim with her Pulitzer Prize-winning collection, “American Primitive” (1983), followed by other accolades.


Guest Speaker, Clairette Durand-Gasselin

Clairette Durand-Gasselin is a bilingual poet and visual artist. She’s currently completing her Master’s in Literary Translation at Université Paris Cité. During her eight years in the United States, she co-founded Mad Gleam Press, a small bilingual publishing house. She is now secretary and blog editor at Paris Lit Up.

Our Host

In Paris via New York and Iowa, Elliott KB is a poet and translator whose work explores themes of estrangement, place, body, gender and intimacy. They have published award-winning poetry in online and print publications alike, and currently work both in the publishing industry and as a professional translator. A part of an interdisciplinary artistic scene, they have now joined the world of radio to host This is Not a Poem.

Spring, by Mary Oliver in New and Selected Poems. Read the full poem here.


Episode 1 – Brian Bilston’s Ceci n’est pas un poeme with Yannick Champion-Osselin

This week in This is not a poem we discussed poetic snobbery, literary assumptions and cultural perspectives between the English and French language. We asked “what is a poem?”, and where can we find fun while engaging with art?

We discuss the poem Ceci n’est pas un poeme by Brian Bilston and consider it as translated into French by Yannick Champion-Osselin.

This Episode was hosted by Elliott KB, produced by Yannick Champion-Osselin, created by World Radio Paris, and recorded in our studios in Paris, France.

In This Episode

Who is Brian Bilston?

British poet Brian Bilston has earned acclaim as “The Poet Laureate of Twitter” with his clever and humorous verses, amassing up to 400,000 followers. With three poetry collections, a Costa Book Award-nominated novel, and the moniker “the Banksy of the poetry world,” Bilston’s diverse and accessible literary contributions resonate across genres and platforms. You can find his poetry on Facebook, X, and Mastodon

Our Host

In Paris via New York and Iowa, Elliott KB is a poet and translator whose work explores themes of estrangement, place, body, gender and intimacy. They have published award-winning poetry in online and print publications alike, and currently work both in the publishing industry and as a professional translator. A part of an interdisciplinary artistic scene, they have now joined the world of radio to host This is Not a Poem.

Guest speaker

With years of bilingual education under his belt and a taste for literature and culture, Franco-British WRP journalist Yannick Champion-Osselin is both a producer and occasional co-host of This is Not a Poem.

Works of art:

  • This Is Not a Pipe, aka. The Treachery of Images, a painting by Belgian surrealist René Magritte.
  • Illustration of the ‘hat’ from Le Petit Prince, aka. The Little Prince, a novella written and illustrated by French aristocrat, writer, and military pilot Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.
Treason of Images